Dan's Corner with Director of Training and Publications Dan Loomis

Kirk Sundling, Director of Training Development at International Food Protection Training Institute talked to Omnipress about some of the challenges that arise when designing a training program.

Watch Kirk discuss his organization’s approach to translations, versioning and incorporating learner feedback into their course materials.


Dan wraps up the video by suggesting a way to manage inventory risk when the popularity of your new course is unknown.

Video Transcript:

Important Things to Consider When Designing A Training Program

DAN: Last week we were privileged to sit down with Kirk Sundling of the International Food Protection Training Institute to discuss some of the things they consider when they develop a new course.

KIRK: The process for launching course all starts with regulation and the implementation of FISMA.

And the big one was preventative controls for human food.

That was our largest. And versioning is kind of the process for keeping up to date.

Obviously, there’s always changes in regulations and what those stipulations are. And that kind of drives the versioning.

But obviously you print something the first time, it’s not going to be perfect.

So what you have to do is you have to understand that going into it and create an appropriate timeline for those changes to get the next version.

So going from version 1.0 and then going from a version 1.1.

The same thing with even translations. From going from an English version of preventative controls for human food to a Spanish version.

You’ve got to be very careful on that versioning and also on the translation.

DAN: Kirk, thanks for sharing. Some really good information for organizations to consider when they’re developing new course material. I think all organizations are challenged with similar things.

You have to consider your version control, when is content going to change? Is it based on regulations or is it based purely on attendee feedback?

Then you have to consider language—are you going to need to do translations for your content?

The most important part of all that then is making sure you select the right print model so you don’t overproduce and have a bunch of unnecessary spending.

It’s always kind of an unknown world, you’re not sure when things are going to change.

So maybe out of the gates with a new course, you don’t want to take advantage of a large print run and the cost per unit, only to throw things away.

So maybe print-on-demand is the right model out of the gates until things get solidified.

Kirk, thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and information. I hope other organizations can find this beneficial.