google-site-verification: googlef883a6e29ff25395.html Marketing with Conference Content: Part 4 – Promoting Your Conference with Twitter - The Omnipress Blog

Twitter is one of the most intimidating social media sites for people to start using. I’s seemingly secret language of #s and @s can easily scare off newcomers who try to use the service for the first time. (It’s such a common problem that Twitter has a glossary page to help users learn the terminology!)

Once you understand the basics, though, Twitter can be a fantastic tool for event professionals (or #eventprofs, in twitter lingo). Its design works well for promoting a conference or creating year-round awareness of your association. And, if your conference content is already available on a digital publishing platform, you are in luck! Twitter can extend the life of your content beyond your conference dates and make these assets effective year-round promotional pieces.

Being active on Twitter gives you a way to promote your conference, connect with industry thought leader and stay on top of industry news.

Here are 16 ways you can use Twitter to raise the profile of your association and conference.

Note: If you are new to Twitter, you’ll need to set up an account and get started before you can use these tips.

  • Create a hashtag for your event: This allows users to search for your event and to join in on the conversation.
  • Mention speakers from your conference: Speakers with an existing online presence can help spread the word about your event.
  • Create links to your existing content: Show the Twittersphere the kind of quality content your conference is known for.
  • Use quotes from your conference content: Pick interesting statements that your followers can retweet.
  • Encourage app downloads: Increase downloads of your app in the days leading up to the conference by including a link to the Apple Store or Google Play.
  • Promote your conference: Include details like date and location, then link to your registration form.
  • Tweet pictures from last year’s event: Keep your event top of mind by posting images from your previous events.
  • Tweet your social images: Twitter is the perfect place to showcase your infographics or other conference-promoting graphics.
  • Make announcements about attendance: Create excitement by tweeting out milestone attendance markers.
  • Promote your other online accounts: Make sure your Twitter followers know where to find you on other social networks like LinkedIn and Facebook.
  • Promote updates to your website: Alert your followers about new materials that have been added to your digital publishing platform.
  • Find and follow thought leaders in your industry: Strengthen your in-person relationships by adding online connections.
  • Retweet interesting thoughts and articles from industry sources: Sharing their message with your followers may make them more likely to return the favor.
  • Search for relevant industry hashtags: Add these to your tweets, too, so people interested in your topic will see your messages.
  • Retweet news articles relevant to your industry: Make your feed the go-to source for the latest developments in your field.
  • Create a poll about a current event: Twitter lets you quickly poll your followers. Ask a question about a current event in your industry.

 

Being active on Twitter lets you connect with industry thought-leaders and attendees on a platform that they prefer. By engaging in industry-specific conversations, you can reinforce the expertise that your organization brings to the subject…all in 140 characters or less!

What are some of the other ways you have used Twitter to promote your conference? Any suggestions for creative ways to incorporate your existing conference content on the platform?

 

Interested in learning more about promoting an event with your existing conference materials?

Check out the other entries in our Marketing with Conference Content series for more ideas:

Part 1: The Event Planner’s Advantage

Part 2: 3 Ways to Stand Out From the Crowd by Using Images

Part 3: How to Learn From Your Own Content [Infographic]